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A Changed Supreme Court Could Derail Climate Progress

Does the loss of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg mean the future of federal climate policy is in jeopardy? What will a changed Supreme Court mean for climate change, and for the all-important endangerment finding? The Gang weighs in.

Then, the great plastic cover-up. How important are plastics to the profits of fossil fuel companies? We dive into an important investigation from NPR and Frontline into how fossil fuel companies hoodwinked the public on plastics recycling.

Then last, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is out with an important and long-awaited policy that opens the door for all types of distributed energy – hot water heaters, batteries, rooftop solar, electric cars – to feed energy into the grid in the aggregate. Are we finally there?

Recommended reading, viewing:

  • Scientific American: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Leaves a Nuanced Legacy on Env. Issues
  • Politico: Ginsburg Left a Long Environmental Legacy
  • Axios: The Climate Stakes of the Supreme Court Fight
  • Guardian: Oil industry lobbies US to help weaken Kenya’s strong stance on plastic waste
  • Fast Company: Surprise: Your cleaning supplies are full of fossil fuel
  • Frontline: Plastic Wars
  • NPR: How big oil misled the public into believing plastic would be recycled
  • Greentech Media: ‘Game-Changer’ FERC Order Opens Grid Markets to DER
  • Houston Chronicle: FERC opens grid to power aggregators
  • Twitter: Peter Cavan’s thread
  • Twitter: Ari Peskoe’s thread

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